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Building Computer-A nerds rise to greatness

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  • geogolem
    replied
    Re: Building Computer-A nerds rise to greatness

    Originally posted by DakAttack View Post
    SLI will never be a good idea.
    Why do you say that? I have heard great things about SLI. Its a really good upgrade path too since you can by one high end card now and a few years down the line buy a matching card (much cheaper) and get performance near the newest cards on the market at that time.

    I've never personally had an SLI but I have never really had a cutting edge PC with a high end graphics card anyway... just waiting on GTX 560 TI to price drop so I can grab one and make my PC capable of playing FF XIV.

    ---------- Post added at 05:58 PM ---------- Previous post was at 05:54 PM ----------

    Originally posted by Kingofsquirrelz View Post
    I am just getting this computer for FF14 but i get the government discount they have looked at all the parts and they say that at my pay out of pocket range will be from 1200-1500 for the parts. Pretty good instead of the 2000 retail i am just worrdied about the combatatbility for the i7 3820 and the BIOS on the mobo
    Personally, I've never heard of issues with CPU/BIOS. If the socket matches up and the motherboard supports the CPU there shouldn't be any problems with the BIOS. Perhaps what they were talking about was BIOS support for overclocking? I don't know enough about current parts on the market etc. but in general if you plan to overclock or unlock you want to make sure the mobo you get has a BIOS which supports doing that. There are other options but the best is usually when the BIOS supports what you want to achieve. Anyone else have any thoughts?

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  • Kingofsquirrelz
    replied
    Re: Building Computer-A nerds rise to greatness

    I am just getting this computer for FF14 but i get the government discount they have looked at all the parts and they say that at my pay out of pocket range will be from 1200-1500 for the parts. Pretty good instead of the 2000 retail i am just worrdied about the combatatbility for the i7 3820 and the BIOS on the mobo

    Leave a comment:


  • DakAttack
    replied
    Re: Building Computer-A nerds rise to greatness

    SLI will never be a good idea.

    Leave a comment:


  • geogolem
    replied
    Re: Building Computer-A nerds rise to greatness

    Definitely don't need to waste money on so much memory. 16GB is more than enough. 12GB is fine but sometimes with dual channels setups and matching etc. 16GB is easier or not much more $$$....

    I would personally not spend $500 on a GPU like that but I never tend to have a cutting edge computer. I always lag behind a year or 2 regarding all my specs. (just can't afford it). Since your going all out on everything else you might as well.

    I don't know about your PSU being overkill or not. It will definitely give you options in the future regarding upgrading or possible SLI configurations.

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  • DakAttack
    replied
    Re: Building Computer-A nerds rise to greatness

    Your RAM is completely overboard, and so is your power supply.

    I don't know why you downgraded your speakers, since they're important for gaming, or why the monitor isn't listed anymore. Twenty-four inches, widescreen, would have been fine.

    My suggestions: 12GB of RAM, 750w power supply, the 5.1ch speakers, and the 24-inch monitor.
    Last edited by DakAttack; 03-27-2012, 01:11 PM.

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  • Kingofsquirrelz
    replied
    Re: Building Computer-A nerds rise to greatness

    Wish list. Price
    COOLER MASTER HAF 912 RC-912-KKN1 Black SECC (Case) $59.99
    Corsair Force Series 3 CSSD-F120GB3A-BK 2.5" 120GB(hard Drive) $149.99
    Intel® Core™ i7-3820 Processor $319.99
    GeForce GTX 680 (GPU) $500.00
    GIGABYTE GA-X79-UD3 LGA 2011 Intel X79(mobo) $249.99
    Corsair Vengeance 32 GB DDR3 1600MHz(RAM) $289.99
    Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-Bit $100-200
    HP 24X DVD RW (SATA) LS Internal, 1270vi $40.00
    CORSAIR H80 (CWCH80) High Performance Liquid CPU Cooler $95.00
    Logitech S2220 2.1 Speaker System $30
    RAIDMAX RX-1000AE 1000W ATX12V v2.3 $120


    OK i am going to order tomarrow so i have been doing ALOT of research and i am 100% sure all these parts match, although there is the issue of the BOIS that i didnt understand somthing about 0430 or somthing like that so i need a nerd reveiw

    Leave a comment:


  • Oniwabanshu
    replied
    Re: Building Computer-A nerds rise to greatness

    Originally posted by geogolem View Post
    I think you just hit on part of the tradeoff on the 3820. It uses a different socket than the 2x00k line... I need to do some more research.. If this is the case the mobo needs to support that socket etc. It may be beneficial to stick with the 2x00k cpu especially if its socket and mobo will be more upgradable in the future... like I said, I'm just catching up to whats going on these days...

    I have no idea what is the better choice betwen LGA2011 and LGA1155... any thoughts?
    Your 2011 socket is a pure enthusiast socket, just as the 1366 socket. The 1155 is a highend mainstream socket. the next gen of intel (ivy Bridge) will be using 1155 and 2011 though it will be on the "tick" cycle and in most cases is not even worth the money for an upgrade since the microarchitecture is still the same as the sandy bridge just the die size has changed from 32nm to the 22nm. as to which is better, that would be a personal question and if you want to spend the extra now for the quad channel ram support or wait for the "tock" 22nm Haswell expected in mid to late 2013. Both Sockets are expected to be supported for the Ivy Bridge but again will most likely lack the overwelming "wow" factor you would expect more of a "tock" chip

    Tick, Tock?
    1366vs1155vs2011 Tom's HW

    Leave a comment:


  • geogolem
    replied
    Re: Building Computer-A nerds rise to greatness

    I think you just hit on part of the tradeoff on the 3820. It uses a different socket than the 2x00k line... I need to do some more research.. If this is the case the mobo needs to support that socket etc. It may be beneficial to stick with the 2x00k cpu especially if its socket and mobo will be more upgradable in the future... like I said, I'm just catching up to whats going on these days...

    I have no idea what is the better choice betwen LGA2011 and LGA1155... any thoughts?

    Leave a comment:


  • Hayde
    replied
    Re: Building Computer-A nerds rise to greatness

    Originally posted by Kingofsquirrelz View Post
    Well the for the cost issue i have no problem the 3820 i can get cheaper than the 2700 but for base reasons the reason why it is cheap is beacuse it does not come with a stock cooler, As for time i plan on building this computer over the next couple of weeks to months depending on what is going on. I will gladly take a LONG time to build this machine even if it take 3 weeks to get a single part. I will go with the 3820. and Just save up to buy a cooler simce all my gaming nerd friend tell me how bad stock coolers are
    You can get a good cooler for relatively "cheap"--at least in terms of computer hardware prices:

    CoolerMaster Hyper 212 EVO:

    Newegg.com - COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 EVO RR-212E-20PK-R2 Continuous Direct Contact 120mm Sleeve CPU Cooler Compatible with latest Intel 2011/1366/1155 and AMD FM1/AM3+

    I generally recommend the 212+ to most people since it's virtually the same thing and it's frequently on sale for $20-25; however the i7 3820 runs on the LGA2011 socket which the former does not support...so EVO is probably your "cheapest" option. There's not a whole lot of variations for coolers for an LGA2011 board since most of those chips are considered enthusiasts.

    In terms of desktop the former LGA2011 lines were:

    Core i7 Extreme 3980X
    Core i7 Extreme 3960X
    Core i7 3930K

    All three of those chips easily ran for over $600-700USD on launch, and probably remains that high to this day. Because of these power hungry chips, you probably won't likely be able to run a cheap stock fan on the machine without heat issues at any rate. My suggestion? Either go for the EVO (second Newegg link) which will probably be one of the better air-cooling solutions, or go for gold and hook up a Corsair H60 or H80--which will unfortunately run a fair bit higher for price. There are some arguments on whether the H60 is actually even better than the EVO, although there is little questioning for that with the H80.

    However, since you're running what intel considers to be an "enthusiast" CPU, I would not expect to find a $15 third party cooler anywhere around...at least not without the possibility of doing harm to your system.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kingofsquirrelz
    replied
    Re: Building Computer-A nerds rise to greatness

    Well the for the cost issue i have no problem the 3820 i can get cheaper than the 2700 but for base reasons the reason why it is cheap is beacuse it does not come with a stock cooler, As for time i plan on building this computer over the next couple of weeks to months depending on what is going on. I will gladly take a LONG time to build this machine even if it take 3 weeks to get a single part. I will go with the 3820. and Just save up to buy a cooler simce all my gaming nerd friend tell me how bad stock coolers are

    Leave a comment:


  • geogolem
    replied
    Re: Building Computer-A nerds rise to greatness

    lol, the only use I would have for an integrated graphics card would be to benchmark the system with it and make myself feel good by how much better the benchmark runs without it and with the discrete GPU I bought...... lol... I wouldn't not buy a processor because it has a GPU though if the price/performance/power ratios led me to believe that processor was more suited for my needs... I would just keep it around for a backup... Basically the integrated GPU is a nice bonus if its there but not something you need to look for or worry about if you plan on buying a discrete GPU...

    Another situation where an integrated GPU is useful is if you absolutely needed to build a PC today but didn't have or want to settle on a discrete GPU... i.e. you could have the computer up and running and buy the GPU of your choice at a later date or when the price comes down... Then again, you can always just buy a really cheap GPU for like 30$ to get you by...
    Last edited by geogolem; 03-15-2012, 04:35 PM.

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  • Hayde
    replied
    Re: Building Computer-A nerds rise to greatness

    Geo is correct; the graphics card associated with CPU's are "integrated" and you will most likely trash your computer before ever using it. The purpose of integrated cards are generally for people who don't concern themselves with PC gaming or heavy rendering--ever. It's a perfect solution for the guy/gal building (or buying) a computer just to do your casual office work, surfing the web, and maybe streaming a few movies along the way. This is generally why the "office" PC's you find at stores only have integrated GPU's installed and no discrete options.

    The only other reason(s) you *might* end up using it is if:

    A. Your GPU dies at some point and you need a temp fix.
    B. Your GPU arrives DoA and you need a quick fix to get the rest of the system running.
    C. You have computer problems and you're removing part-by-part to find the troubling piece of hardware.

    There's probably a few other reasons you might use it...but in short, go for the 3820...unless you want to overclock the CPU. I would need to see what they mean by "partial" unlock (I did notice the lack of "k" in the model number).

    Leave a comment:


  • geogolem
    replied
    Re: Building Computer-A nerds rise to greatness

    I'm no expert (though I am a computer engineer), but in my opinion you shouldn't care about the graphics core since you will most likely be using a discrete graphics card. 2x00k models look like a decent bang for the buck though the 3820 model looks good because it supports 4 channels on the memory as well as a faster memory but also seems to be more power hungry.

    The integrated graphics are useful since you can boot the machine etc. without a graphic card but if you plan on maxing out games etc. I think discrete graphics are necessary....

    Personally I'm just catching up to whats going on these days in tech so take my advice with a grain of salt...

    Just by looking at the table above, personally I would go for the 3820 model but I would do research, read reviews and ask on these forums first.

    Also, personally I wouldn't waste money on anything better than a GTX 560 TI.. and I would wait a few weeks to a month or so when nvidia releases the 6xx series of cards and buy the 560TI on the cheap (if I had that i7 processor [which I dont] I would try and get a 2GB card with the potential for SLIing in the future),

    Make sure you get a nice quality power supply. You can drag this with you from system to system.
    Last edited by geogolem; 03-15-2012, 09:50 AM.

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  • Kingofsquirrelz
    replied
    Re: Building Computer-A nerds rise to greatness

    Is the I7-2700k better because It has a graphics core or should i stick with the I7-3820- Make note tis computer is primarily for FF14

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  • Kingofsquirrelz
    replied
    Re: Building Computer-A nerds rise to greatness

    I was looking online and i saw something with the processor Click image for larger version

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